International Education Week

IEW 2021 Schedule & Event Details

Join us for guest speakers, lectures, workshops and fun activities all week long to support international education efforts at UMBC! 

Let’s bring the world to UMBC!


Friday, November 12

DreamZone Training: Immigrant Allyship Development Workshop

  • Time: 10 a.m. – 4 p.m.
  • Friday, November 12

This 5.5 hour workshop is designed to help students, staff, faculty, and alumni to create a more welcoming, affirmative atmosphere for immigrant members of the UMBC community. The program includes a variety of activities for community members at all levels of knowledge and comfort with the immigrant experience and concerns, from basic terminology, core concepts, immigrant intersections, stories to skills-based sessions on immigrant-based policy and allyship development.

  • Delivery: In-Person
  • Link to more information and RSVP: (RSVP Required): Click here

Celebrating Your Country

  • Time: Noon – 2 p.m.
  • Friday, November 12

Show decorations, food from your country, dress, slideshow, short videos and represent your country!


Monday, November 15

Tools for Safe International Travel During Uncertain Times

  • Time: 10 – 11 a.m.
  • Monday, November 15

COVID-19 has changed the way we think about travel. Come learn about what you need to know to travel internationally and some tools that UMBC has to help guide you.

International Community Building Through Dance and Film: Discussion & screening of the film “El Movimiento” from Mexico

  • Time: 11 a.m. – Noon
  • Monday, November 15

This panel will discuss film dance, international collaboration and co-creation.

  • Delivery: Virtual
  • Link to join: Click here
  • Having trouble joining? Email Catalina Sofia Dansberger Duque atcsdd@umbc.edu

Allie Gardner, dancer and community organizer, will speak on the creation of the film, El Movimiento Project and international collaboration

Carol Hess, chair and professor of dance, Carol Hess has been making dances for nearly four decades. Born in New York City, she trained there as a dancer, and began a performing career in modern dance and as a tap soloist. In the genre of modern dance, much of her recent choreography has focused on the interaction between dance and video. Many of her dances for the stage feature the use of live camera feeds and/or pre-recorded images. She also choreographs, films and edits dances for the camera. She will speak about dance on film and the use of film editing & live editing of dance during performance.

 

Ann Sofie Clemmensen, assistant professor of dance, has worked collaboratively with various choreographers and visual artists, such as Henri Oguike, Darshan Singh-Bhuller, Wendy Houstoun, Francesco Scavetta, Sølvi Edvardsen, Tatiana Baganova and others. Her stage and film work has been featured both nationally and internationally, including Beijing, China and Puebla, Mexico. “Ann Sofie Clemmensen’s work is consistently intelligent, structurally designed, a treat for the audience and for the bodies moving through it” (by Fenella Kennedy.) Clemmensen previously taught at Ohio State University, Department of Dance, and worked professionally as a dancer and teacher in Europe.

Clemmensen will speak on International exchange and dance.

 

Ximena Roy, intermedia creator and researcher, is the director and editor of the film El Movimiento. She will speak about dancing for the camera.

Moderator: Joshua Gray ‘24, dance and media and communications studies at UMBC.

That’s Awkward: Identifying Awkward Phrases through Sentence and Paragraph Structure

  • Time: Noon – 1 p.m.
  • Monday, November 15

Writing Workshop for international students that focuses on paragraph structure, sentence structure, and identifying and fixing awkward phrasing.

Study Abroad 101

  • Time: Noon – 1 p.m.
  • Monday, November 15

These introductory sessions cover everything you need to know to start the process of studying abroad including how to choose a program, how to pay for it, and how credits transfer.

  • Delivery: Virtual
  • Link to more information and to join: Click here

Tuesday, November 16

Deutsch macht Spass!

  • Time: 1 – 2 p.m.
  • Tuesday, November 16

Drop by FA011 for fun interactive games (“Who Wants to Be a Millionaire”, German board games) showcasing German culture. There’s a chance to win prizes, too!

  • Delivery: In person
  • Location: FA 011

Discover Education Abroad!

  • Time: 2 – 3 p.m.
  • Tuesday, November 16

Stop by and see Education Abroad to learn more about exciting programs and opportunities from EA staff and faculty representatives. There’s something for everyone!

  • Delivery: In person
  • Location: UC 204

ELI Global Café

  • Time: 4-5 p.m.
  • Tuesday, November 16

The UMBC ELI Global Café gives a place meet and speak with people from around the world who love cultural exchange. It is also a special place to hear different cultures and histories through fun topics and activities.

Decolonizing Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages (TESOL)

  • Time: 4:30 – 5:30 p.m.
  • Tuesday, November 16

World renowned scholar Professor Angel Lin will speak about what it means to teach English as a second or foreign language in a globalized world still dominated by the historical processes of imperialism and colonialism and the cultural and psychological aftermath of such processes. She will describe what is needed to interrupt the working of the effects of these processes at the micro and macro levels of critical analysis and intervention in TESOL.

  • Delivery: Virtual
  • More information: Click here
  • Register and link to join: Email tesol@umbc.edu for link to join

Wednesday, November 17

Practicing Feminists Methodologies Abroad (and at Home)

  • Time: 10 – 11 a.m.
  • Wednesday, November 17

This panel will discuss topics related to: feminismo, research abroad, linguistic barriers, feminist methodologies, ethics of doing research abroad

  • Delivery: Virtual
  • Link to join: Click here
  • Having trouble joining? Email Catalina Sofia Dansberger Duque at csdd@umbc.edu

María Célleri, assistant professor of gender, women’s, and sexuality studies, current book project, Uncovering the Virgen del Panecillo: Quito’s Postcolonial Urban Transformation & Decolonial Future Imaginaries examines the political and symbolic importance of the monument of the Virgen del Panecillo in a postcolonial cultural research study of how public monuments come to represent and often reproduce national imaginations which are then mapped onto national territories.

Célleri will discuss her research in Ecuador, archival work, collaborations, activist research in the U.S., access, language, and challenges of working abroad.

Thania Muñoz, assistant professor of Spanish, Latin American and Latinx literature and culture; affiliate faculty of language, literacy and culture; and gender, women’s, and sexuality studies, is the Co-Editor in Chief of Latino Literatures – A Cultural and Literary Journal. Muñoz focuses on the marginalization of Spanish language as a vibrant literary language in the U.S, contemporary Latin American immigrant literature, memory and intertextuality studies to explore how these narratives negotiate belonging within the boundaries of the United States and across the Americas.

Muñoz will speak about research in México and the U.S., immigrant communities in the U.S., language justice, story telling, and literary creativity.

Moderator: Valerie Pasión, a graduate student of geography and environmental systems at UMBC.

Teaching and Research Abroad: Three Economists’ Perspectives

  • Time: 11 a.m. – Noon
  • Wednesday, November 17

Description: Coming Soon!

  • Delivery: Virtual
  • Link to join: Click here
  • Having trouble joining? Email Catalina Sofia Dansberger Duque at csdd@umbc.edu

Maria Bernedo Del Carpio, assistant professor of economics, research focus is in applied microeconomics, predominantly environmental, development, behavioral, and urban and regional economics. Her interests in these fields stem from her desire to contribute to enhancing the quality of life of individuals, especially of those who are most vulnerable. She is particularly interested in improving the designs and evaluations of public interventions that affect environmental and social outcomes.She recently published a paper, “Community-based monitoring to facilitate water management by local institutions in Costa Rica” in the Proceedings of the National Academy of the United States of America.

Bernedo Del Carpio will speak about conducting field experiments abroad.

 

Tim Gindling, professor of economics, researches different aspects of labor in developing economies to meet populations’ long-term needs. He is currently the 2021 – 2022 Lipitz Professor of UMBC’s College of Arts, Humanities, and Social Sciences (CAHSS). This endowed professorship celebrates, acknowledges, and sponsors cutting-edge research and teaching. He is currently collaborating with the United Nations University World Institute for Development Economics Research (UNU-WIDER) in Helsinki, Finland on a global research project on informal work. In spring 2022, he will return to China to continue a research collaboration on income inequality at the Nanjing University of Economics and Finance.

Gindling will speak about conducting international research as a faculty researcher and student, current research, and student mentorship and supervision.

 

Dennis Coates, professor of economics, research focuses on political economy and public policy issues with emphasis on sport and sports economics topics. He is the editor of the Journal of Sports Economics and on the editorial boards of the International Journal of Sport Finance, the Journal of Sport Management, Public Choice and several other journals. Coates was the founding president of the North American Association of Sports Economics.

Coates will discuss how he started working with international collaborators, and the personal and professional benefits of doing so

Study Abroad 101

  • Time: 11 a.m. – Noon
  • Wednesday, November 17

These introductory sessions cover everything you need to know to start the process of studying abroad including how to choose a program, how to pay for it, and how credits transfer.

  • Delivery: Virtual
  • Link to join and for more information: Click here

True Grits: Global Street Food Fest! (Lunch)

  • Time: 11 a.m. – 2 p.m.
  • Wednesday, November 17

Discover a taste of the world! Visit True Grits for a dining hall takeover from 11-2 featuring delicious street foods from around the globe.

American Passport Project

  • Time 11 a.m. – 3 p.m.
  • Wednesday, November 17

Stop by Commons 331 to get information on how to get your passport and learn about study abroad options!

  • Delivery: In-person
  • Location: Commons 331

Finding and Creating Community Away from Home

  • Time: 4 – 5 p.m.
  • Wednesday, November 17

Finding and Creating Community Away from Home is a facilitated conversation among international students and students who have studied abroad or intend to do so. The conversation will focus on how participants have been or hope to be able to form meaningful connections and make contributions in their temporary communities (geographic, campus, etc.).

  • Delivery: In-person
  • Location: Commons 318

Fulbright English Teaching Assistant & English Language Fellow Program

  • Time: 7-8:30 p.m.
  • Wednesday, November 17

Current TESOL MA students and recent alumni are welcome to an information session for U.S. State Department opportunities to teach English overseas – the Fulbright U.S. Student English Teaching Assistant Program and the English Language Fellows Program. Alumni of these program will be in attendance to speak to their experiences!

  • Delivery: Virtual
  • More information: Click here
  • Register and link to join: email tesol@umbc.edu

International Short Film Screening

  • Time: 7:30-9 p.m.
  • Wednesday, November 17

4-ILE language cluster Chinese, French, Spanish and Japanese will get together to screen and briefly diccuss short films in the target languages with English subtitles

  • Delivery: Virtual
  • Link to join: Click here
  • Link to more information and RSVP: Email Dr. Elisabeth Arévalo-Guerrero at eliarev1@umbc.edu

Thursday, November 18

Afghanistan Twenty Years Later: How everything has changed & nothing has changed

  • Noon – 1 p.m.
  • Thursday, November 18

This panel will provide with a brief overview of the recent history of Afghanistan as it relates to the current situation, starting from the 1979 invasion of the Soviet Union, the 1989 withdrawal and consequent civil war, the 1995 takeover of the Taliban, their defeat in 2001 by the U.S. and coalition force, followed by the 20 years of ongoing war in Afghanistan from which the U.S. just withdrew in late August. Afterwards, the panel will begin an open discussion about current issues facing Afghanistan today.

  • Delivery: Virtual
  • Link to more information and RSVP: Click here
  • Having trouble joining? Email Catalina Sofia Dansberger Duque at csdd@umbc.edu

Zareen Taj is a doctoral student in language, literacy, and culture. She is an Afghan women’s rights/human rights activist, who came to the U.S during the first reign of the Taliban. She has shared research in conferences, given speeches, and has written numerous op-eds about Afghanistan. Taj has made frequent personal and professional trips back to Afghanistan since 2004. She was the first Afghan woman who visited five massacre sites. Taj interviewed the  survivors of the Taliban Massacre, produced a video documentary about her journey, and wrote the book Journey to Empowerment: Women After Taliban.

 

Noor Zaidi, assistant professor of history, has done extensive field work in Pakistan and with Shia clerics and activists in Iraq after the collapse of the Saddam regime. She is a scholar of Middle Eastern History with a specialization in Iraq, Syria, and Pakistan. Her current research focuses on the construction of sacred space in Shia Islam. After the collapse of the Saddam regime, Iraq worked to create a new identity, positioning itself at the center of the Shia world. Dr. Zaidi’s research covers this transformation, working to understand the effects of these changes on faith and culture.

 

Anne Brodsky, professor of psychology, has spent extended periods of time in Afghanistan and Pakistan throughout the 2000s. Her work centers around the risk and resilience of Afghan women with a focus on Afghan women’s communities and activist organizations. Brodsky studies individual and community level resilience and the role of communities, psychological community, and cultures in creating and resisting societal risks, including community violence, poverty, racism, sexism and other oppressions.

Moderator: Christine Mallinson, director of UMBC’s Center for Social Science Scholarship and professor of language, literacy, and culture and affiliate professor of gender, women’s, and sexuality studies.

Approaches to Intercultural Research: Big Data Media, Endangered Languages, & Global Citizenship

  • Time: 1-2 p.m.
  • Thursday, November 18

This panel will speak about applying intercultural research to develop intercultural communication training models and workshops and how it leads to global citizenship. They will also discuss the process of researching lesser-known languages and collaborating with researchers in France to compare T.V. shows in France and the U.S.

  • Delivery: Virtual
  • Link to join: Click here
  • Having trouble joining? Email Catalina Sofia Dansberger Duque at csdd@umbc.edu

Irina Golubeva, associate professor of intercultural communication, multilingualism, citizenship education, internationalization of higher education, developing intercultural competence for future career and for study abroad. She teaches and publishes in four languages: English, Hungarian, Russian, and Spanish. Professor Golubeva’s main research interests concern the development of multilingual awareness and intercultural competence, internationalisation of higher education, and conceptualization of intercultural citizenship.

She will talk about her research on global citizenship, how it is developed, and what global citizenship means today.

 

Renée Lambert-Brétière, associate professor of linguistics and French, Her research focus is on the relationship between language and culture, and on fieldwork-based documentation and description of lesser-known languages, from a typological discourse-based functional and cognitive linguistics perspective. She works on languages exhibiting very different typological profile such as: Fon (Benin), Kwoma (Papua New Guinea), Innu (Canada), Caribbean Creoles

Lambert-Brétière, will speak about collaboration-based language research and the documentation of endangered language

 

Landry Digeon Ph.D. ‘20, language, literacy, and culture, visiting lecturer at UMBC in the department of modern languages, linguistics, and intercultural communication.

Digeon will discuss: Global TV series Adaptations: An AI approach to cultural representations between France and the US.

Study Abroad 101

  • Time: 3 – 4 p.m.
  • Thursday, November 18

These introductory sessions cover everything you need to know to start the process of studying abroad including how to choose a program, how to pay for it, and how credits transfer.

  • Delivery: Virtual
  • Link to join and more information: Click here


Friday, November 19

Saying Thanks Around the World

  • Time: Noon-2 p.m.
  • Friday, November 19

Student will meet virtually, and express gratitude in many different words and gestures used around the world to relay this message and show to others.

Immigration Options After Graduation

  • Time: 3-4:30 p.m.
  • Friday, November 19

Learn about immigration options for after graduation, such as H-1B and Permanent Residency, from an accomplished immigration attorney.

  • Delivery: Virtual
  • Link to more information and RSVP: click here

About International Education Week

A joint initiative of the U.S. Department of State and U.S. Department of Education, International Education Week (IEW) is an opportunity for campuses to celebrate international education in all its forms: curricular, extracurricular, formal, non-formal and everything in between. International Education Week is for everybody!

The International Education Week committee encourages all areas of campus to get involved in IEW. We want to celebrate our international community, support international initiatives on campus, and share international experiences with domestic students and communities they might not otherwise be exposed to.

Let’s bring the world to UMBC!